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Monthly Archives: May 2018

Pt Loma Northern Parula continues, and Black Swift bonanza at Ft Rosecrans NC, Sunday 5/20/18

This morning (5/20), a little before 0930, I saw the NORTHERN PARULA in the tall eucalyptus described  by Alex Abela who found this bird yesterday 5/19 along the Nazarene College trail at the north end of the concrete culvert there. Soon afterwards, Eric Kallen and I responded to Gary Nunn's  0930 RBA text about the 3 BLACK SWIFTS,  and quickly joined him there at Fort Rosecrans and spent an amazing hour with him counting 36 more, plus saw one of the PURPLE MARTINS.   Thank you Gary for getting the word out so quickly.  It was indeed a thrill to see all those swifts migrating through and provided me with a County Bird  that has been my nemesis for years!  Sue

Susan Smith

Seiurus Biological  Consulting
Del Mar, CA 
—–Original Message—–
From: Gary Nunn <garybnunn@…>
To: sandiegoregionbirding <sandiegoregionbirding@groups.io>
Sent: Sun, May 20, 2018 11:03 am
Subject: [SanDiegoRegionBirding] FRNC – Black Swifts & more, May 20, 2018

Down here at Fort Rosecrans National Cemetery and seen total of 39 BLACK SWIFT moving northbound. Many in groups as many as 12 together. Movement appeared to start about 9am lasting until about 10:30am.

Also 8 Purple Martin and a single Bank Swallow.

Will post photos later!

Gary Nunn,
Pacific Beach



Susan Smith
Seiurus Biological Consulting
Del Mar, CA
Source: SanDiegoRegionBirding Latest Reports

FRNC – Black Swifts & more, May 20, 2018

Down here at Fort Rosecrans National Cemetery and seen total of 39 BLACK SWIFT moving northbound. Many in groups as many as 12 together. Movement appeared to start about 9am lasting until about 10:30am.

Also 8 Purple Martin and a single Bank Swallow.

Will post photos later!

Gary Nunn,
Pacific Beach
Source: SanDiegoRegionBirding Latest Reports

Northern Parula – Point Loma Nazarene University

This morning a NORTHERN PARULA was present at Point Loma Nazarene University near the north end of the concrete culvert that runs along the eastern edge of the campus between Dupont and Garden streets.   The bird spent time near the tops of myoporum and other flowering shrubs as well as a tall eucalyptus located along the fenceline:
A MacGillivray's Warbler and Olive-sided Flycatcher were in the same area, as well as a few other common western migrants.  The far northern end of campus near the alumni house was also reasonably birdy with Hermit, Wilson's, Yellow, and Townsend's Warblers.
Alex Abela
San Diego, CA

Source: SanDiegoRegionBirding Latest Reports

Three notable specimens for San Diego County from last fall and winter

Dear friends,

 

I should also mention three other notable specimens for San Diego County we received at the San Diego Natural History Museum via Project Wildlife and prepared earlier this year.

 

First was a juvenile Long-tailed Jaeger found at Mission Beach on 4 September 2017 (now SDNHM 55586).

 

Next and most remarkable was a Black Swift found in Escondido on 23 September 2017 (now SDNHM 55524). One wing was broken at the wrist, so the bird probably hit some obstacle with the wing, then crashed, unable to fly. San Diego County records of the Black Swift are far fewer in spring than in fall. The only previous specimen was also picked after having struck a telephone wire near Escondido—on 5 June 1921 (https://sora.unm.edu/sites/default/files/journals/condor/v023n05/p0168-p0169.pdf).

 

Finally, a Fork-tailed Storm Petrel was picked up on the Ocean Beach pier on 9 January 2018 (now SDNHM 55587).

 

You can see photos of all three specimens at https://www.westernfieldornithologists.org/gallery/.

 

Thank you to Lea Squires and Maria Gonzalez for their time and expertise in helping to prepare these specimens, and to Linda King for being our liaison with Project Wildlife, always doing her best to ensure the specimens we receive have the most complete and accurate data possible.

 

Good birding,

 

Philip Unitt

San Diego

Source: SanDiegoRegionBirding Latest Reports

First San Diego County specimen of the Nazca Booby

Dear friends,

 

Today Lea Squires prepared San Diego County’s first specimen of the Nazca Booby, found freshly dead on a buoy off 24th St., National City, by boater Mark Woodruff on 5 May 2018. Mark had seen the Nazca Boobies in that area earlier this year and recognized the dead bird as that species too. But, remarkably, it was not one of the same individuals, which were full adults, but a subadult in which the bill was just becoming orangish. Most likely it was the same subadult seen alive by Matt Sadowski in the bay off Chula Vista on 1 May. The bird had an empty stomach and was somewhat emaciated; it had not swallowed a fishhook, as so many of the boobies we receive have. It was molting over much of the body plumage, the primaries, and three rectrices (the outermost two plus one intermediate rectrix were growing in). The head was still speckled with brown, as were the wing coverts and rump.

 

This incursion of the Nazca Booby thousands of miles from its normal range may represent bad news for the species. A study published last year (http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0182545) links lowered reproductive success of the Nazca Booby in the Galapagos to a shift from a diet of sardines (8% fat) to less nutritious flying fish (<1% fat), a shift that took place in the wake of El Niño of 1997-98 and has not been reversed since. And the authors warn that the increasing ocean temperature is likely to preclude the anchovy population of the Galapagos from recovering. Perhaps 15 to 20 years of a diet of leaner fish is driving the Nazca Booby to search far beyond its normal range for better feeding.

 

In any case, this new specimen is the for California that shows the distinctive bill color of the species. It is now catalog number 55680 in the museum’s bird collection. The first specimen for California, preserved in the Western Foundation for Vertebrate Zoology, was an immature found long dead and dried on a beach in Ventura County on 27 July 2013. The identification of that specimen was confirmed by genetic analysis of the feathers (https://www.westernfieldornithologists.org/archive/V47/47(1)-p058-p066.pdf).

 

Good birding,

 

Philip Unitt

San Diego

Source: SanDiegoRegionBirding Latest Reports

Swainson's Hawk Flyover Sorrento Valley; 18 May 2018

I observed what appears to be a high-flying coastal SWAINSON’S HAWK today, 18 May 2018. The bird was fairly drab and appears to be immature. The date is getting close to the end of the species spring migration window.  Highly cropped and essentially brown and white photos are in ebird report.

 

https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S45813712

 

 

Tito Gonzalez

Carlsbad, CA

Source: SanDiegoRegionBirding Latest Reports

Point Loma 5-18-18

I birder several spots in Point Loma this morning. It was pretty slow.

The silk oak in the alley between Silvergate and Catalina had most of the decent birds, but a few were found on Albion.  Continued utility construction made it difficult to get around.
Western Tanager M
Townsend's Warbler 5
Wilson's Warbler 2
Yellow Warbler 2
Hooded Oriole 8

Fort Rosecrans
Warbling Vireo
Barn Swallow
WT Swift 2
Hooded Oriole F
Western-wood Pewee
Pac Slope fly

Famosa Slough – southerly section willows
Warbling Vireo 6+ ( I had  6 in view at one time)
Townsend's  Warbler
Hooded Oriole 3 M

Eric Kallen
Source: SanDiegoRegionBirding Latest Reports

W-w Scooter, Brown Boobies, early Osprey fledging

On Friday the 18th, there is a large (for the date) flock of Surf Scoters just a little north of the Imperial Beach pier which contains one female type White-winged Scoter. Be aware that there is also a single male surf scoter in the flock that is very worn and shows a prominent fake white wing patch. Also today, scoping out from the south end of Seacoast Drive it didn't take long to spot a couple brown boobies flying around, and they continue to be regular here in small numbers particularly in the early morning. Yesterday, the 17th, there was already a fully-fledged young Osprey hundreds of feet away from the nest at San Diegito Lagoon in Del Mar, which seems like a somewhat early date to already have fledged, but maybe I'm wrong on that…

The saltworks pond at the end of 13th Street in Imperial Beach still has as many as 41 Red Knots, four breeding plumaged Dunlin, and up to 75 Western Sandpipers lingering.

Paul Lehman, San Diego

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Source: SanDiegoRegionBirding Latest Reports

Re: May White-cr. Sparrow reports, silk-oak bird counts, Tricolored

Hi,

In response to Paul's comments about recent White-crowned Sparrow reports, I sent him a link to a list from Flintkote from this past Sunday May 13 where John Bruin and I, and maybe Terry Hurst saw a Dark-lored White-crowned Sparrow. Paul said it was a Dark-lored Oriantha sub-species.

I would imagine this is the same bird Eric Kallen said he and Tuck Russell saw on May 10th, as it was in the same general location where he reported it. For us it was in the area to the left of the ranger's house.

It wasn't very cooperative for us, but John managed to get a photo of it. Our list with the photo is here:

https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S45629310

Here is a link to the e-mail Eric sent on the 10th with a link to his photo(s):

https://groups.io/g/SanDiegoRegionBirding/message/8210?p=,,,20,0,0,0::Created,,Flintkote,20,2,0,19145585

Lisa Ruby
Sabre Springs
Source: SanDiegoRegionBirding Latest Reports